Monday, March 5, 2012

Persuasive Writing with Hey, Little Ant!



My absolute favorite book to use for teaching persuasive writing is "Hey, Little Ant." It is the perfect book for teaching persuasive writing. It takes the form of a debate between and ant and a little boy. The boy wants to squish the ant and argues why he should. The ant argues why the boy should let him go. The story ends with the little boy's shoe still up in the air and no decision having been made.

We read the story and then make a t-chart with reasons why the boy should and should not squish the ant. Then, I model ask the class who thinks the boy should squish the ant and who thinks the boy shouldn't squish it. Next, I will model completing a graphic organizer listing my opinion and three reasons. After I have modeled it, the students complete their organizers. Next, I model showing the kids how to write a persuasive paragraph arguing their point of view. Once the kids have written their paragraphs we hang it up with a cute shoe that they colored. 

 Some of the kids thought the boy should squish the ant.

Other students thought the boy shouldn't squish it.


11 comments:

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    1. You are welcome. I am glad you like it. I enjoy your blog too.

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  2. Can you post an example of how the graphic organizer would be filled out? Do they list more than just three reasons on all the lines and then choose their favorite three? I love the idea, I'm just trying to figure out how it is intended to be filled out. I would LOVE to use this with my students! We have not persuasive writing at all yet this year.

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    1. I don't have any pictures of the completed graphic organizer. So, I'll try and explain it the best I can. We did a t-chart together with reasons to squish the ant on one side and reasons not to on the other. Students shared their ideas and I listed them on the board.We did this section on the rug. Before I gave the students their graphic organizer they had to tell me which side they were going to argue. Then, they copied their three favorite ideas (or listed their own if they could)onto their graphic organizer.

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  3. So, are the three blank lines on each row for a complete sentence to be written on? . . . Or, does one word go on each blank line?

    Thanks SO much for your help! I am excited to use this idea! Writing is overwhelming for me to figure out how to teach and I love how you've broken this down and made it so simple to understand!

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  4. I usually have the kids write a complete sentence on each column of lines for a total of three complete sentences.

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  5. Thanks SO much!

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  6. Great lesson! I love this book, too!

    Michelle
    Teach123

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  7. ok thanks for the help,but can u put an example of the essay

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  8. I also love this book I wanted some ideas and this website gave it to me thanks and great work students

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  9. This is awesome! Thanks so much!

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